Jezerca lakes (also called Buni i Jezercës) is a fantastic outdoor destination near the highest peak of the Accursed Mountains (Prokletije), Maja Jezercë. The easiest way to go to the lakes is from Vusanje in Montenegro. But, if you want an off-trail adventure, you definitely should try going from Valbona Valley National Park in Albania. Check out my blog for that hike: Jezerca lakes from Valbona, a challenging off-trail hike.

 

How to get to Vusanje

The starting point for this trail is near Gërla Canyon in Vusanje, Montenegro. You need to drive around 4 hours from the capital of Kosovo, Prishtina (about 215 km), or 3 hours from the capital of Montenegro, Podgorica (approximately 150 km).

Also, you can take the bus to Plav or Gusinje and then take a taxi from there to Vusanje.

If you have a four-wheel car, you can drive up to Zastan hut, which may save you around 2 hours.

 

About the Jezerca lakes hike

The hike to Jezerca lakes starts from the Gërla Canyon in Vusanje, Montenegro. There you can find a restaurant called Restaurant Hartini. Near the restaurant, you can find the Gërla waterfall.
After 1.5 km of walking, on your right side, you can find a wonderful spring called the Blue Eye of Vusanje or Oko Skakavice (The eye of a grasshopper). The water is drinkable, and there you can find the last water source of this trail. (Note: During October and November is completely dry, so you need to fill the bottles at the restaurant I mentioned above). From there you will take the forest trail, which is around 6 km long until you reach the last and the most beautiful lake. The total distance is approximately 26 km if you don’t have a four-wheel car and a 12 km drive until Zastan hut.

Note: This trail is available starting from June until November. The trail is dangerous during the snow season.

 

Points of interest:

Starting point: Vusanje

Starting altitude: 860 m/alt

Elevation gain: 1’300 m

Elevation loss: 1’300 m

 

I’ve attached the wikiloc trail to Jezerca lakes. You can download and follow it:

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